Brief history of Poppleton and historical background of the villages.

Nether and Upper Poppleton have coalesced to become one village of Poppleton.  The villages share many amenities including shops, doctors, dentist, the Community Centre with tennis, bowls and football facilities, churches and many societies, clubs and youth organisations.

However, there are two separate Parish Councils which meet at the Community Centre:  Upper Poppleton on the second Monday of each month at 7pm; and Nether Poppleton on the third Monday of each month, also at 7pm with the Planning agenda first followed by the Parish Council agenda.

The villages also have many green communal spaces such as the village green in Upper Poppleton, where the annual sports day is held on the Public Holiday at the end of May, and the river walk in Nether Poppleton, which follows the River Ouse for a circular walk, which is popular with everyone, or alternatively a walk to Moor Monkton, the next village upstream.

The villages have a shared history and are recorded in the Domesday Book.  It is amazing to read that there are 7 references to both Upper and Nether Poppleton, named Popletune in the Doomsday book. The Survey done on the instruction of William the Conqueror in 1086/7.  The various references refer to the Poppletons under the overall management of a number of theologians starting with Archbishop Thomas who delegated the day to day management of a deacon named Ode. The area consisted of 12 acres, 4 furlongs and woodland pastures , in total worth 40 shillings.

There are two conservation areas, one in each village.  The maps are included in the Poppleton Neighbourhood Plan which became law in 2017.  This is a planning instrument used to ensure housing and other buildings are developed in sympathy with the surrounding settlement.  At the Referendum on the Neighbourhood Plan 91% of the village voted in support of the document, which is a testimony to the involvement of villagers in the community.  A key element of the Neighbourhood Plan was to keep the historic character and setting of the villages and preserve the Green Belt and open spaces.

Historic Character and Setting.

The Old English name “pople” probably means “pebble” and the “tun” implies a non-forested landscape or hamlet farm.  Thus Poppleton may have originated as “a farmstead on pebbly soil”. Nether implies that this part was closer to the river and with evidence of Roman and Anglo-Saxon settlement is probably the older part of the two villages.

There are many grade 11* listed buildings in both settlements and the History Society of Poppleton and the Village Design Statement (2003) list the architectural history and development of both villages.

Nether Poppleton

Upper Poppleton

Kilburn House Manor Farmhouse Gate and Railings
Barn at Manor Farm Model Farm, Barn and Railings
Church of St Everilda’s Greenview
Tithe Barn ( Prince Rupert’s Barn) Beechwood House
Dovecote at Manor Farm Russett House
Gazebo North of Fox Garth Priory House
Monument 1198194/11988389 Orchard House (1700-1732)
36 Church Lane circa c17 Boundary posts SE 5303 and SE 5336
Dodsworth Free school building All hand water pumps in both villages
Old School House

Over the past 20 years, the History Society of Poppleton have researched and published a series of books outlining the history and assets of the village.  The titles show the wide range of expertise and interest within the village community.[1]

River Roads and Railways: The Story of Transport in Poppleton(1991)  Michael Fife, Ian Routledge and John Perkins

Scholars, Schools and Staff of Poppleton (1993) by 10 authors , edited by Michael Fife

Georgian Poppleton ( 1994) by Prudence Bebb

Exploring the Poppletons – Nether and Upper (1998) Mark Jones and Michael Fife

The Public Houses of Poppleton (1999) Barrie Davies

One Hundred Years of Poppleton Children’s Sports Day (2000) by Helen Mackman

Poppleton Sons of the Great War Remembered (2018)

 

[1] Series of books available from the History Society all priced at £3.00